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The Origin of Peninsula Cuisine – Then and Now!

Posted in Culinary Treasures, Itineraries

The Origin of Peninsula Cuisine – Then and Now!

Tour Description:

According to legend, lore and history, the Long Beach Peninsula has long been a treasure trove of culinary delicacies. For centuries, the Native Americans used the seafood, berries and game as currency to obtain items that otherwise would have been unattainable, such as buffalo robes, beads, metal pots, and yes, even the treasured Obsidian.

This tour takes your passenger on a culinary and history trip from the past to the present. Your first evening on the Peninsula will take you to the third level of The Adrift Hotel for an enchanting view of the Pacific Ocean and the famous Long Beach Boardwalk…but that is not all….the repast from the Pickled Fish restaurant will sure to please and tantalize your taste buds with Crab Cakes, Oysters, Scallops, Chicken Lamb, Beef, or the beach favorite….Mac ‘N Cheese being offered!

Your breakfast is prepared by one of the most respected eating establishments on the Peninsula. One cannot walk down the main street of Long Beach, without being drawn into their establishment….just by the aromas, not counting the steady stream of people going in and out of the establishment’s twin red doors. The Bakery has long been known for its baked items, but wait until you taste their fare for your daily morning meal.

As you walk down the streets of yesteryear in the village of Oysterville, imagine this as a boomtown. They had discovered ‘gold’ but not the kind that is found in the ground…no, this ‘gold’ comes from the sea in the form of OYSTERS! When you visit the Oysterville Sea Farm, Dan will tell you stories of his family’s’ dream – “Oyster Dreams!” Oh yes, did I mention that a demonstration on how to shuck the oyster will be given?

The studio of Eric Wiegardt is in the Victorian home built by his oyster pioneering great grandfather! As you study his watercolor work, you will notice that many of his subjects live and work right on the Peninsula. His notecards are wonderful, and they would fit right in a suitcase!

The Cranberry is so important to the area, that a festival is named in its honor! The Native Americans would grind the berry along with dried deer meat, and that became a sustainable meal during the long wet winter months. Today, it tells a different story….a success story and the Cranberry Museum tells it better than anyone!

Your dinner on the eve of your departure will be prepared by the chefs of the Shelburne Inn. This historic piece of architecture has been serving visitors continually since 1896, and the same impeccable service that made it successful then is still present today. David Campiche and Laurie Anderson, owners/managers strive to maintain that level of excellence! By using only the freshest and finest of ingredients, many coming right from the Peninsula, their guests return again and again.

On the day of your departure your passengers will visit the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum. It is here that they will discover the mystery of the “Daddy Train” as told by the conductor. They will learn of the importance of ‘tides’ and how it affected the lifestyle of the “rich and famous” from that ‘big city’ of Portland…in the 1800’s!

Upon exiting the museum, your guests will be greeted by the Lavender And proprietor to give a brief history of this newest culinary and sensory delight that is making its mark on the Peninsula. While not indigenous to the Peninsula, this crop finds the Peninsula an ideal growing spot. Each guest will receive a Lavender Sachet bag handmade by the owner Patty Bagley-Hill.

What could be more intriguing than your “Bon Voyage” luncheon served to you at the Montesano City Hall, complete with greetings from the Mayor! And surprise entertainment! Not to mention delicious fare prepared by the owners of the Abel House Bed and Breakfast!

Farewell and Happy Travels to your next adventure.

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